DEFINING MOMENTS

An Idea Worth Spreading

SOAP
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The greatest thing about working with presentations is that we can learn new things every day.

 

Every message we convey in beautiful graphics brings us something new. Ideas about strategy, information about culture, insight into marketing, strategies in finance.

 

Some presentations are so specific and technical we can’t deep-dive into the subject matter, some are product related, some are business related.

 

Others can really make an impact outside the corporate walls, involving concepts that go beyond the business life to find application in the personal life as well.

 

Matthew Kenney, a chef with a classic culinary background who transitioned from his entire food paradigm to became a leading Raw food chef and best-selling cookbook writer, came to us to help him build the presentation he was going to deliver at TEDxAmericanRiviera in Santa Barbara, California.

     

 

This was news to me! A raw food diet? How does it work?

 

From the outset, the idea really got to me. (So far, though, changing the habits of a lifetime is still a work in progress.)

 

But who has never not felt heavy or lazy after a meal? Who has never eaten something and in the very next second realized that something shouldn’t have been eaten?. And if such second-thought messages come through so fast and obviously, I can just imagine all the others that come more subtly and slowly.

 

This is definitely something we need to look at: what we’re eating, and the consequences of it for our bodies and, ultimately, for the environment. We need to understand the complex (and non-sustainable) food chain we’re involved in and how some foods continue to be processed in us long after we’ve finished eating them.

 

So when we hear something about the benefits of a cuisine that’s healthy and beautiful and delicious, we really should want to hear more, right?

 

Which is why Matthew Kenney’s food concept is an idea worth spreading (and internalizing).

 

 

 

 

The PowerPoint presentation used by Matthew Kenney was created by SOAP.